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After Iraq's Election: Shiites and Iran

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After Iraq's Election: Shiites and Iran

After Iraq's Election: Shiites and Iran

After Iraq's Election: Shiites and Iran

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4498436/4498437" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Two weeks after millions of Iraqis cast their first free vote in over fifty years, the results are now in. A coalition of Shi'ite Islamic parties won 48 percent of the vote, less than the 60 percent expected. Since a two-thirds majority is needed to form a government, the coalition, dominated by the United Iraqi alliance, will need the support of other parties in order to govern as a majority. The United Iraqi Alliance is headed by two religious Shi'ite parties: the Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq and Dawa. It also has close ties to its neighbor, Iran.

Guests:

Doug Struck, Washington Post reporter, in Baghdad; profiled Shiite leader Adel Abdul Mahdi, who may be Iraq's new prime minister

Larry Diamond, senior fellow, the Hoover Institution, Stanford University; advised the Coalition Provisional Authority in Baghdad, January to April 2004

Juan Cole, professor of Modern Middle Eastern history at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; author, Sacred Space and Holy War: The Politics, Culture, and History of Shiite Islam

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