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Computers Recreate Dinosaur Strides

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Computers Recreate Dinosaur Strides

Science

Computers Recreate Dinosaur Strides

Computers Recreate Dinosaur Strides

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4502184/4504034" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Over the past decade, scientists have learned a great deal about how dinosaurs moved and stood. The American Museum of Natural History in New York hopes to highlight this new dinosaur knowledge in an upcoming exhibit.

The museum has turned to two high-tech workshops that use the latest in computer animation and simulation technology to create realistic — and moving — versions of the prehistoric creatures.

This perfectly scaled, six-foot-long, moving T. rex model is a prototype of a much larger model the American Museum of Natural History in New York plans to feature in an upcoming exhibit. It will be used to illustrate how the giant creatures really moved. Christopher Joyce, NPR hide caption

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Christopher Joyce, NPR