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The Words and Legacy of Malcolm X

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The Words and Legacy of Malcolm X

Remembrances

The Words and Legacy of Malcolm X

The Words and Legacy of Malcolm X

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4507696/4507697" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Malcolm X was assassinated at the age of 39. Laurence Henry, Laurence Henry Collection, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, The New York Public Library hide caption

toggle caption Laurence Henry, Laurence Henry Collection, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, The New York Public Library

Forty years ago, legendary black activist Malcolm X was murdered. He was giving a speech Feb. 21, 1965 in the Audubon Ballroom in Manhattan when he was gunned down.

Excerpts from Speeches

Source: Malcolm X Speaks Out © 1992 Dr. Betty Shabazz by Curtis Management

From 'By Any Means Necessary' (1965)

Only Available in Archive Formats.

From 'A Mental Resurrection' (1964)

Only Available in Archive Formats.

From 'A Mental Resurrection' (1962)

Only Available in Archive Formats.

From 'Uncle Sam Has Failed Us' (1964)

Only Available in Archive Formats.

Malcolm X, who was born Malcolm Little in Omaha, Neb. in 1925, described himself as "the angriest black man in America." Some of that anger — as well as his humor and politics — is audible in an excerpt from a speech from the year before his death.

Commentator and author Murad Kalam offers a tribute, saying that Malcolm X is missed today by American Muslims, who have no contemporary leader like him.

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