NPR logo

Legislators Call for Truth in Movie Times

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4516516/4516517" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Legislators Call for Truth in Movie Times

Legislators Call for Truth in Movie Times

Legislators Call for Truth in Movie Times

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4516516/4516517" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Making sure you catch the opening credits at a big movie like Million Dollar Baby or Aviator means sitting through what can seem like a feature-length round of previews and commercials. In the run-up to the Oscars, Democratic state Rep. Jack Franks added Illinois to a growing list of states proposing two start times for movies: One when the lights go down and the trailers begin, and another when the movie actually begins.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.