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Experts Debate Whether 'Hobbits' Were Human

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Experts Debate Whether 'Hobbits' Were Human

Research News

Experts Debate Whether 'Hobbits' Were Human

Experts Debate Whether 'Hobbits' Were Human

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4522345/4522346" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The skull of Homo floresiensis, a newly discovered, "hobbit-size" species of human, next to a modern human skull (right). Fully adult, H. floresiensis was barely three-feet-tall and had a skull the size of a grapefruit. Nature hide caption

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News broke last October that archeologist had discovered a hobbit-like creature on an Indonesian island. Now neurologists have examined the creature's brain and believe it to be a lost relative of modern humans, just a bit smaller. But the debate is far from over.

About the Flores Find

Since it was first reported last October, the Flores fossil has generated much interest — and controversy — within the scientific community. Read on:

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