Arguing an AIDS Drug for Mothers Health experts say millions of AIDS deaths in Africa can be prevented by giving mothers and newborns a drug called nevirapine at the time of birth. More than 500,000 mothers and children have taken the drug. But a debate is raging over the safety and ethics of nevirapine. NPR's Richard Knox explains the latest science on nevirapine.
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Arguing an AIDS Drug for Mothers

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Arguing an AIDS Drug for Mothers

Arguing an AIDS Drug for Mothers

Arguing an AIDS Drug for Mothers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4524733/4524734" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Health experts say millions of AIDS deaths in Africa can be prevented by giving mothers and newborns a drug called nevirapine at the time of birth. More than 500,000 mothers and children have taken the drug. But a debate is raging over the safety and ethics of nevirapine. NPR's Richard Knox explains the latest science on nevirapine.