Selma's 'Bloody Sunday' Recalled Forty years ago today, a civil rights march to Montgomery, Ala., erupted into violence at the Pettus Bridge, where police erected a blockade. The incident, now known as "Bloody Sunday," left 50 marchers hospitalized after police used tear gas, whips and clubs against them. NPR's Jennifer Ludden speaks with one of the march leaders, Rev. Frederick Douglas Reese.
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Selma's 'Bloody Sunday' Recalled

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Selma's 'Bloody Sunday' Recalled

Selma's 'Bloody Sunday' Recalled

Selma's 'Bloody Sunday' Recalled

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4524742/4524743" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Forty years ago today, a civil rights march to Montgomery, Ala., erupted into violence at the Pettus Bridge, where police erected a blockade. The incident, now known as "Bloody Sunday," left 50 marchers hospitalized after police used tear gas, whips and clubs against them. NPR's Jennifer Ludden speaks with one of the march leaders, Rev. Frederick Douglas Reese.