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Sprinklers Feed Major Alaska Ice Sculpture

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Sprinklers Feed Major Alaska Ice Sculpture

Sprinklers Feed Major Alaska Ice Sculpture

Sprinklers Feed Major Alaska Ice Sculpture

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4528632/4528633" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The tower of ice is an estimated 160 feet tall. Alaskan Alpine Club hide caption

More Photos of the Sculpture
toggle caption Alaskan Alpine Club

Melissa Block talks with John Reeves, self-described freeform industrial ice artist. Reeves is the artistic genius behind a 160-foot tall ice sculpture outside of Fairbanks, Alaska. Using strategically placed sprinklers, Reeves estimates that he flows about 6,000 gallons of water onto the sculpture every hour.

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