Examining Vitamin E Supplements The use of Vitamin E and other anti-oxidants has been suggested as a way to help the body fight off cancer. But new research published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that taking Vitamin E could do more harm than good in some cases.
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Examining Vitamin E Supplements

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Examining Vitamin E Supplements

Examining Vitamin E Supplements

Examining Vitamin E Supplements

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The use of Vitamin E and other anti-oxidants has been suggested as a way to help the body fight off cancer. But new research published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that taking Vitamin E could do more harm than good in some cases. Researchers concluded that "in patients with vascular disease or diabetes mellitus, long-term vitamin E supplementation does not prevent cancer or major cardiovascular events and may increase the risk for heart failure."

Guest:

Greg Brown professor of medicine. University of Washington School of Medicine. Attending physician, University of Washington Medical Center