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View from the Back Yard
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View from the Back Yard

Author Interviews

View from the Back Yard

View from the Back Yard
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As sprawl continues to roll away from America's cities, past the suburbs, the farther most people have to travel to experience wilderness. But fortunately, as development pushes into nature, nature is pushing its way back into development. The plots of grass ringing suburban homes sustain a surprising variety of life.

Science writer Hannah Holmes, author of the new book, Suburban Safari: A Year on the Lawn, spent a year studying her own suburban tract in Portland, Maine. She talks about what she found by closely inspecting her fifth of an acre.

Guest:

Hannah Holmes, author, Suburban Safari: A Year on the Lawn

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