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The Fight to End Poverty

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The Fight to End Poverty

Author Interviews

The Fight to End Poverty

The Fight to End Poverty

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Economist Jeffrey Sachs wants to end global poverty. He says simple measures — like a mass distribution of mosquito nets — could have a huge impact. We host a conversation with Sachs about a blueprint for a more prosperous world.

Guest:

Jeffrey Sachs, director, Earth Institute at Columbia University; author of The End of Poverty: Economic Possibilities for Our Time

Book Excerpt

The path from poverty to development has come incredibly fast in the span of human history. Two hundred years ago, the idea that we could potentially achieve the end of poverty would have been unimaginable. Just about everybody was poor with the exception of a very small minority of royals and landed gentry. Life was as difficult in much of Europe as it was in India or China. With very few exceptions, your great-great-grandparents were poor and most likely living on the farm. One leading economic historian, Angus Maddison, puts the average income per person in Western Europe in 1820 at around 90 percent of the average income of sub-Saharan Africa today. Life expectancy in Western Europe and Japan as of 1800 was probably about 40 years.

If we are to understand why vast gaps between rich and poor exist today, we need therefore to understand a very recent period of human history during which these vast gaps opened. The past two centuries, since around 1800, constitute a unique era in economic history, a period that the great economic historian Simon Kuznets famously termed the period of Modern Economic Growth, or MEG for short. Before the era of MEG, indeed for thousands of years, there had been virtually no sustained economic growth in the world and only gradual increases in the human population...