Toulouse-Lautrec and Montmartre

In the late 19th century, the Montmartre district of Paris was a mecca for artists and bohemians. And no one captured the spirit of the place quite like painter Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. A new exhibit at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., explores Toulouse-Lautrec's work from this exciting time.

Robert Siegel talks with Dr. Philip Conisbee, a curator at the museum, about "Toulouse-Lautrec and Montmartre."

The exhibit is open at the National Gallery through June 12. It will be at The Art Institute of Chicago, July 16-Oct. 10.

'Ambassadeurs: Aristide Bruant, 1892'

hide captionAmbassadeurs: Aristide Bruant, 1892 is among the best-known works of Henri Toulouse-Lautrec on exhibit at the National Gallery of Art.

Credit: The Art Institute of Chicago

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