Comic Book Science in the Classroom

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The graphic novel  'Bone, Sharps, Cowboys, and Thunder Lizards'

Bone, Sharps, Cowboys, and Thunder Lizards depicts "Gun-Totin' and Gamblin' Professor John Bell Hatcher," along with Colossal & "Stupefying Dinosauria of the New World." G.T. Labs hide caption

itoggle caption G.T. Labs
Alberta Porter used the graphic novel  'Dignifying Science'

Alberta Porter used the graphic novel Dignifying Science in a recent lesson to tell the stories of female scientists. G.T. Labs hide caption

itoggle caption G.T. Labs

A new experiment in Maryland has students and teachers using comic books as learning tools. The program illustrates an ongoing debate: do teachers give students a challenge, or offer less difficult material that is more likely to spark their interest?

The books are meeting with mixed reviews among fifth-graders at at Lisby-Hillsdale Elementary. As 10-year-old Hunter Haag said of the difference between regular books and graphic novels, "it's kind of good about not having pictures, because you get a chance to make it up in your mind."

But some students say neither comic books nor adventure books can compete with their first passion: video games.

Books Featured In This Story

Bone Sharps, Cowboys, And Thunder Lizards

by Jim Ottaviani, Zander Cannon, Shad Petosky, Kevin Cannon and Mark Schultz

Paperback, 165 pages | purchase

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Title
Bone Sharps, Cowboys, And Thunder Lizards
Author
Jim Ottaviani, Zander Cannon, et al

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Dignifying Science

Stories About Women Scientists

by Donna Barr, Mary Fleener and Jim Ottaviani

Paperback, 142 pages | purchase

Purchase Featured Book

Title
Dignifying Science
Subtitle
Stories About Women Scientists
Author
Donna Barr, Mary Fleener, et al

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