Picking a Spot for a Lunar Base New work published in the journal Nature takes a close look at the surface of the moon, as seen through the eyes of the Clementine spacecraft. Close analysis of the data from that mission reveals a spot near the Moon's north pole that is permanently in daylight. A base placed there, the authors say, would have plentiful solar power, and wouldn't be subjected to the massive temperature fluctuations caused by sunrise and sunset on the moon.
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Picking a Spot for a Lunar Base

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Picking a Spot for a Lunar Base

Picking a Spot for a Lunar Base

Picking a Spot for a Lunar Base

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4602303/4602304" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

New work published in the journal Nature, takes a close look at the surface of the moon, as seen through the eyes of the Clementine spacecraft. Close analysis of the data from that mission reveals a spot near the Moon's north pole that is permanently in daylight. A base placed there, the authors say, would have plentiful solar power, and wouldn't be subjected to the massive temperature fluctuations caused by sunrise and sunset on the moon.

Guest:

Ben Bussey, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University

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