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School Features Real-World Learning, No Grades
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School Features Real-World Learning, No Grades

Education

School Features Real-World Learning, No Grades

School Features Real-World Learning, No Grades
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Dennis Littky meets with students Kyle Williams, Jesse Jones and Audris Valdez.

Met school director Dennis Littky meets with students (from left) Kyle Williams, Jesse Jones and Audris Valdez. Sarah Staveley-O'Carroll hide caption

toggle caption Sarah Staveley-O'Carroll
Vimar Rodriguez, left, helps a nurse give a shot to a 14-year-old patient.

During her internship with a pediatrician, Met School junior Vimar Rodriguez, left, helps a nurse give a shot to a 14-year-old patient. Margot Adler, NPR hide caption

toggle caption Margot Adler, NPR

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Students at The Met must give an oral presentation of their projects and internships. Odyssey Smith, who interned at a local hospital, discusses her research on hypertension.

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Met Student Odyssey Smith Gives an Oral Presentation

 

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Dennis Littky is co-founder of the Big Picture schools and is director of one of them, The Met Center in Providence, R.I. Hear Littky on:

The challenges of creating a school like The Met and in creating rigor in the student's projects
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The question: How do you make the outside world understand what you do?
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Creating Big Picture schools around the U.S., and the difficulty of getting good teachers
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How kids in good schools are losing out too, and why The Met's accomplishments matter for everyone
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It's hard to imagine a school with no tests, no grades and no classes. But those familiar elements of education are missing at two dozen Big Picture schools in six states, each with no more than 120 students.

They emphasize work in the real world, portfolios, oral presentations and intense relationships between students and advisers. Margot Adler visits one of the schools, called The Met, the 10-year-old model for the schools, in Providence, R.I.

Students are encouraged to discover their passions, interning two days a week with mentors in the community who relate those passions to the real world. The student might work at a hospital, a bakery, or an architectural firm. School projects are designed by the mentor, the adviser and the student together — and are presented orally, along with a portfolio, every nine weeks.

Vimar Rodriguez, an 11th grader interested in medicine, has a neighborhood pediatrician as a mentor. Dr. Hector Cordero says she knew little when she started interning at his office.

Books Featured In This Story

The Big Picture

Education Is Everyone's Business

by Dennis Littky and Samantha Grabelle

Paperback, 230 pages |

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Title
The Big Picture
Subtitle
Education Is Everyone's Business
Author
Dennis Littky and Samantha Grabelle

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