The Brothers Who Made Mary Poppins Sing

Dick Van Dyke and Julie Andrews in a photo from 1964's 'Mary Poppins'

Dick Van Dyke and Julie Andrews in a photo from 1964's Mary Poppins, along with Karen Dotrice, left, and Matthew Garber. Walt Disney Corp. hide caption

itoggle caption Walt Disney Corp.
The brothers Richard, left, and Robert Sherman.

The brothers Richard, left, and Robert Sherman in an undated photo from the 1970s. Sherman Brothers hide caption

itoggle caption Sherman Brothers
The cast of 'Chitty Chitty Bang Bang'

The music of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, released in 1968, incorporated the car's mechanical sounds. Walt Disney Corp. hide caption

itoggle caption Walt Disney Corp.

A Long Career of Favorites

The Sherman brothers reflect on how some of their best-loved songs came about.

Generations of children have grown up singing the music and lyrics of Richard M. and Robert B. Sherman. They wrote two hugely popular film musicals: Mary Poppins and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. Now both of those well-loved classics have been adapted for the stage.

The Sherman Brothers grew up in a household filled with music – their father, Al, was a popular songwriter from the 1920s through the '40s. According to Richard M. Sherman, it was their father’s idea for the two brothers to work together.

They finally caught on with the Disney studio after writing the seminal "It's a Small World After All." The brothers then penned songs for The Parent Trap and The Jungle Book.

Their music often soared within movie scenes, accompanying Mary Poppins as she levitated and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang as the car flew its passengers across the countryside.

Musicals based on both films are slated to move to the United States after opening in London. The first, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, opens in New York City April 28.

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Mary Poppins

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Album
Mary Poppins
Artist
Julie Andrews, Dick Van Dyke
Released
2004

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