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TraumaMan Offers Lifelike Practice for Med Students

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TraumaMan Offers Lifelike Practice for Med Students

Health Care

TraumaMan Offers Lifelike Practice for Med Students

TraumaMan Offers Lifelike Practice for Med Students

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4624237/4625952" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

TraumaMan is one of various high-tech simulators currently being used in medical training. Nell Boyce, NPR hide caption

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Nell Boyce, NPR

TraumaMan is one of various high-tech simulators currently being used in medical training.

Nell Boyce, NPR

TraumaMan should be called TorsoMan. He's a headless, legless, armless torso with nipples and a belly button. His ribs bulge beneath pink, rubbery skin. The chest rises and falls with each mechanical breath.

But cut TraumaMan, and does he not bleed? Well, yes — or at least, he delivers a "blood flow response" when cut by a scalpel. A synthetic device manufactured by the Seattle-based Simulab, TraumaMan is being used to help surgeons-in-training master emergency skills.

The realism of sophisticated simulators doesn't come cheap: The best go for hundreds of thousands of dollars. TraumaMan runs just a few thousand — but replacement parts cost extra.