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Interviews: Climbing the World's Tallest Peaks

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Interviews: Climbing the World's Tallest Peaks

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Interviews: Climbing the World's Tallest Peaks

Interviews: Climbing the World's Tallest Peaks

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4632063/4632064" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The route Viesturs and his team intend to take up the face of Annapurna. Viesturs attempted to summit the 8,0891-meter (26,658 foot) peak in 2002, but turned back due to dangerous conditions. EdViesturs.com hide caption

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EdViesturs.com

The route Viesturs and his team intend to take up the face of Annapurna. Viesturs attempted to summit the 8,0891-meter (26,658 foot) peak in 2002, but turned back due to dangerous conditions.

EdViesturs.com

Alex Chadwick talks with high-altitude mountain climber Ed Viesturs about his attempt to climb all 14 of the world's highest mountains without the aid of supplemental oxygen. Viesturs has already climbed 13 of the peaks taller than 8,000 meters (approx. 26,000 feet), and is set to climb the last remaining peak, Annapurna. It's a quest that's taken him almost 20 years to complete.

Ed Viesturs at Annapurna base camp in Nepal. Jonathan Chester hide caption

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Jonathan Chester

UPDATE: Viesturs made history on May 12 by successfully summiting Annapurna — making him the first American to climb all 14 of the world's 8,000-meter peaks without supplemental oxygen.