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A Kiss Among Comrades

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A Kiss Among Comrades

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A Kiss Among Comrades

A Kiss Among Comrades

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Linda Wertheimer takes a moment to note that former Polish leader Wojciech Jarulzelski found it very distasteful to have to smooch former East German leader Erich Hoenecker.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

(Soundbite of music)

WERTHEIMER: How do you say, `Let's just shake hands' in German? This week, General Wojciech Jaruzelski, the last Communist leader of Poland, told a German newspaper that his least favorite duty while in office was having to kiss Erich Honecker, the former Communist leader of East Germany. During the Cold War, Communist leaders often greeted one another with a big ol' peck on the cheek. General Jaruzelski said this week that Mr. Honecker, who died in 1994, had this disgusting way of kissing. He didn't go into detail. And given that you're probably eating your breakfast, we won't either.

Coming up, we make a meal worthy of at least half a dozen kisses with Chef Tyler Florence.

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