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Jim and Jamie Dutcher, 'Living with Wolves'

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Jim and Jamie Dutcher, 'Living with Wolves'

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Jim and Jamie Dutcher, 'Living with Wolves'

Jim and Jamie Dutcher, 'Living with Wolves'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4635005/4635238" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Jamie Dutcher laughingly fends off an affectionate advance from a member of the wolf pack. Dutcher Film Productions/Discovery Channel hide caption

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Dutcher Film Productions/Discovery Channel

Wolves have been cast as villains in stories — almost since there have been stories. Jesus warned against them in the Bible; Little Red Riding Hood was tormented by one. They've been favorite symbols of evil from the fables of Aesop to the music of Prokofieff.

A new documentary shatters many lupine myths — and shows just how much like people wolves can be. Jim and Jamie Dutcher are the husband-and-wife team behind Living With Wolves. The pair lived among a single pack in Idaho for six years.