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Letters

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Letters

From Our Listeners

Letters

Letters

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Host Jennifer Ludden reads from listener mail.

JENNIFER LUDDEN, host:

And now your comments. We got lots of them about Jan Swafford's essay on the composer Johannes Brahms and some of his dark brooding. Listener Paul Bernstein(ph) of Chelsea, Massachusetts, wrote, `Although I've been involved in playing piano and singing choral music for decades, I had not known many of the issues Swafford sensitized us to tonight through his artistic blend of music and explanation.'

Listener Terry Nielsen Steinhart(ph) also had praise for the Brahms piece. His letter confessed, `For years I've pelted NPR with diatribes on your musical taste or lack thereof. Naturally I railed because the tastes represented on your programming do not at all jive with mine. Tonight you proved me wrong. You presented a long piece from the authority on my favorite composer, a piece that showed me new ways to view Brahms that illuminated the brilliance of my beloved composer. Thank you from the bottom of my heart.'

Of course, we love hearing your praise, but we're also open to criticism and other comments. So please send your e-mails to watc@npr.org. And please--this is important--include a phone number, tell us where you live and how to pronounce your name.

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