NPR logo

The Story of Las Vegas' Rise from the Desert

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4649395/4649396" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
The Story of Las Vegas' Rise from the Desert

The Story of Las Vegas' Rise from the Desert

The Story of Las Vegas' Rise from the Desert

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4649395/4649396" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bugsy Siegel's infamous mob hangout, the Flamingo Hotel. Nevada State Museum and Historical Society hide caption

toggle caption
Nevada State Museum and Historical Society

The real and lesser-known history of Las Vegas is an important part of the story of America's migration to the west: rail roads; the depression; the construction of the Hoover Dam; water, air conditioning; World War II and America's entry into the nuclear age.

Guests:

Michael Green, professor of history at Community College of Southern Nevada; coauthor of Las Vegas: A Centennial History

Darrell Luce, long-time Las Vegas resident; came to Las Vegas in 1932 at the age of 3 and remembers the building of the Hoover Dam

Alice Key, helped integrate Las Vegas casinos; executive director of the NAACP in the mid '50s; retired deputy labor commissioner of the State of Nevada and community activist; resident of Nevada since 1954