NPR logo

Raising a Family in the Backcountry

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4665936/4665937" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Raising a Family in the Backcountry

Around the Nation

Raising a Family in the Backcountry

Raising a Family in the Backcountry

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4665936/4665937" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Doug Warnock and his wife raised five children in lodges, cabins and even tents in Yosemite, Carlsbad Caverns and Chaco National Monument. Warnock worked for the National Park Service for more than three decades.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Richard Louv says parents don't have to go to Yosemite National Park to get their kids outside, one couple did. Doug Warnock and his wife raised five children in lodges, cabins, even tents in Yosemite, Carlsbad Caverns and Chaco Canyon, during a National Park Service career that lasted more than three decades.

Mr. DOUG WARNOCK (Retired Park Service Ranger): All of those areas were out in what folks might call the boondocks, and there was no TV, limited radio. At Chaco, for instance, we were 60 miles from the nearest store.

Ms. KRISTIN HUGHES (Born in Yosemite National Park): It brought our family very close because we were in very secluded places and it was just--I wouldn't trade it for the world.

MONTAGNE: Kristin Hughes(ph) is the baby of the Warnock family now living with her husband and children in Louisville. She was born in Yosemite National Park.

Ms. HUGHES: It was one of the ways that we actually got to get close to my father was being outside, and I don't know how old I was. I was probably in the third grade, maybe. We went on a canoe trip and we ended up canoeing up this river picking cranberries on the banks. And I just remember it being so peaceful. You know, he created an incredible world for us to grow up in.

Mr. WARNOCK: We'd just enjoy crawling around on the ground looking at the flowers and the bugs and learning what this one does and what that one does. I've got them pretty well trained and I see them with great pleasure doing the same thing with their kids.

MONTAGNE: Retired Park Service ranger and superintendent Doug Warnock and his daughter Kristin on their family's life outside.

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP (Host): And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Copyright © 2005 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.