Voyager Spacecraft Hits Interstellar Turbulence

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NASA Voyager Graphic i

This still shows the locations of Voyagers 1 and 2. Voyager 1 has crossed into the heliosheath, the region where interstellar gas and solar wind start to mix. Walt Feimer/NASA hide caption

itoggle caption Walt Feimer/NASA
NASA Voyager Graphic

This still shows the locations of Voyagers 1 and 2. Voyager 1 has crossed into the heliosheath, the region where interstellar gas and solar wind start to mix.

Walt Feimer/NASA
NASA Voyager 1 Spacecraft Graphic

NASA's Voyager 1 probe is the first man-made object to enter the boundary between the solar system and interstellar space. NASA hide caption

itoggle caption NASA

The first man-made object to enter the boundary between the solar system and interstellar space appears to have reached a turbulent zone. NASA's Voyager 1 has hit a spot where the solar wind begins to give way to interstellar space in a cosmic cataclysm known as "termination shock." California Institute of Technology physicist Edward C. Stone, the mission's chief scientist, fills Melissa Block in on the details.

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