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Painter Kehinde Wiley

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Painter Kehinde Wiley

Painter Kehinde Wiley

Painter Kehinde Wiley

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Kehinde Wiley with one of his b-boy canvases. Roy Hurst, NPR hide caption

toggle caption Roy Hurst, NPR

It was playwright Lorraine Hansberry who coined the phrase "young, gifted and black." Speaking to a group of young writers in 1964, Hansberry said, "Though it be a thrilling and marvelous thing to be merely young and gifted, in such times, it is doubly so, doubly dynamic, to be young gifted and black."

The phrase reverberated out of the civil rights movement. In honor of students nationwide during these weeks of graduation ceremonies, News & Notes is using the theme to spotlight a few people to watch.

On Wednesday, we profile painter Kehinde Wiley, whose lifelike — and life-sized — portraits of break-dancing B-boys in classical poses are catching the eye of collectors and museums.

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