Bill Clinton on Life after the Presidency

Clinton poses for a portrait on a vacation in Colorado, July 23, 2004.

Clinton poses for a portrait on a vacation in Colorado, July 23, 2004. Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Corbis

Clinton Looks Back

President George W. Bush and former Presidents Bill Clinton  and George H. Bush

At the Indian embassy in Washington, Jan. 3, 2005, President Bush brings together former presidents George Bush and Clinton, to launch an appeal for Americans to make a donation to help victims of the Indian Ocean tsunami. Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Corbis
Sen. John Kerry in Philadelphia with former President Bill Clinton.

With Sen. John Kerry at a campaign stop in Philadelphia, Oct. 25, 2004. Kerry Campaign Photo hide caption

itoggle caption Kerry Campaign Photo
Former President Clinton addresses the Democratic National Convention in Boston, July 26, 2004.

Clinton addresses the Democratic National Convention in Boston, July 26, 2004. Reuters/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Reuters/Corbis

Since leaving office, Bill Clinton remains a newsmaker. From his recent travels with former President George H.W. Bush, seeking aid for Asian tsunami victims, to a reported flirtation with the idea of serving as secretary-general of the United Nations, Clinton is taking an expansive view of his new role as former president of the United States.

The former president appears on Talk of the Nation to discuss his presidency, the state of modern politics, and his views on the future. He also took questions and e-mails from listeners.

Below, a look at some of the more notable moments of his presidency and his time since leaving the White House.

Nov. 3, 1992 Clinton elected 42nd president of the United States.

Jan. 27, 1993 White House announces Clinton will order military officials to end policy of discrimination against gays in military.

Dec. 8, 1993 North American Free Trade Agreement signed into law.

Feb. 26, 1993 Islamist terrorists set off bomb in garage of World Trade Center in New York City.

April 19, 1993 Federal agents raid Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Texas. A fire consumes the compound and kills more than 80 people inside.

Aug. 22, 1996 Clinton signs welfare reform legislation.

Jan. 20, 1997 Clinton sworn in for second term.

Aug. 7, 1998, Car bombs explode outside U.S. embassies in Nairobi, the capital of Kenya and in Dar es Salaam, the capital of Tanzania, killing 258 and injuring more than 5,000.

Aug. 17, 1998 Clinton admits to relationship with Monica Lewinsky, 25, "that was not appropriate."

Aug. 20, 1998 In response to embassy bombings, U.S. launches strikes in Afghanistan on camps affiliated with Osama bin Laden.

Dec. 19, 1998 House votes to impeach Clinton.

Feb. 12, 1999 The Senate finds Clinton not guilty on two articles of impeachment.

Sept. 20, 2000 Independent counsel states there is not enough evidence to charge Clintons in Whitewater investigation.

Oct. 12, 2000 USS Cole bombed off coast of Yemen.

Jan. 5, 2001 Clinton announces a ban on logging and new roads on 58.5 million acres covering 39 states.

Jan. 20, 2001 Clinton pardons financier Marc Rich.

Aug. 10, 2001 Knopf announces Clinton will write memoirs. The former president receives a $12 million advance.

Aug. 4, 2001 Clinton moves into Harlem offices in New York City.

Sep. 6, 2004 Clinton has heart bypass surgery (He returns to hospital to have scar tissue removed from lung, March 10, 2005).

Nov. 18, 2004 William J. Clinton Presidential Center in Little Rock dedicated.

Feb. 1, 2005 Clinton chosen as U.N.'s special envoy for tsunami relief in Asia.

April 8, 2005 Clinton attends Pope John Paul II funeral at request of President George W. Bush.

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My Life

by Bill Clinton

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