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Eating in America, Now and Then

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Eating in America, Now and Then

Eating in America, Now and Then

Eating in America, Now and Then

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4677856/4677886" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Remembering a first contest: Don "Moses" Lerman. StoryCorps hide caption

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StoryCorps

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Remembering a first taste: Hargis Ison, 74, with his daughter, Diane Adams, in Whitesburg, Ky. StoryCorps hide caption

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StoryCorps

A First Taste

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Hargis Ison describes his first taste of store-bought bread in the 1930s.

From hot dogs to ice cream and bread, Americans love their food. But it can sometimes mean more than a simple meal. As part of the StoryCorps oral history project, we offer two stories in which that is most definitely the case.

Don "Moses" Lerman is a fierce competitor — but he's not exactly an athlete. Lerman is a competitive eater. He attends most major events on the IFOCE (International Federation of Competitive Eating) circuit. He can still recall winning his first contest.

And as a bonus, a viewpoint from Whitesburg, Ky. Hargis Ison grew up in Kentucky in the 1930s. Here, he tells his daughter, Diane Adams, about the first time he ate bread from the grocery store, sharing it with his 10 siblings.