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Disposable Camcorder Debuts

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Disposable Camcorder Debuts

Technology

Disposable Camcorder Debuts

Disposable Camcorder Debuts

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4694922/4694988" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The CVS one-time-use video camcorder retails for $29.99. Video processing is an additional $12.99. Pure Digital Technologies hide caption

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Pure Digital Technologies

Videos

Watch sample e-mailed versions of videos from the camcorder. (The versions that play on a DVD player would be of higher quality.)

A new $30 one-time-use camcorder goes on sale at CVS stores. Consumers must pay an additional $12.99 to have the camera's 20 minutes of video processed and put onto a DVD.

The cameras, about the size of an iPod, are expected to be recycled by the company about five times before their final disposal.

Melissa Block talks to USA Today technology reporter Jefferson Graham about the camera's advantages and shortcomings.

Pros

• Highly portable, the camera fits in a pocket and weighs about 5 ounces. (The camera doesn't use tape; it stores the video on 128 MB of internal flash memory.)

• Can be used for spur-of-the moment events — or if you're on vacation and forgot to bring a camcorder.

• Easy to share videos on the Internet and via e-mail.

Cons

• No zoom capability.

• Can't plug the camera into your TV or computer.

• Can only view the last clip recorded, not the entire 20-minute video.

• At a 640 x 480 pixel resolution, the video quality is less than traditional DV camcorders.