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Study: Friendly People Live Longer

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Study: Friendly People Live Longer

Study: Friendly People Live Longer

Study: Friendly People Live Longer

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4712838/4712839" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The more friends you have, the longer you might live. That, at least, is the finding of a study in Australia. Researchers tracked phone calls and personal contacts of 1,500 people. According to the study, people with more friends and confidants tended to live "significantly longer" than others. However, the key appeared to be making friends — not family. People whose network revolved around children and relatives didn't get any benefit at all.

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