Recognizing Faces Tied to Single Neurons Neuroscientists generally scoff at the notion that the brain uses a single neuron to recognize and remember each object or person in our memories. But a new study in the journal Nature suggests the brain makes an exception for Halle Berry and other special people and places.
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Recognizing Faces Tied to Single Neurons

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Recognizing Faces Tied to Single Neurons

Recognizing Faces Tied to Single Neurons

Recognizing Faces Tied to Single Neurons

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4714583/4714584" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Neuroscientists generally scoff at the notion that the brain uses a single neuron to recognize and remember each object or person in our memories. But a new study in the journal Nature suggests the brain makes an exception for Halle Berry and other special people and places.