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Gone But Not Forgotten: Winlock Egg Days

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Gone But Not Forgotten: Winlock Egg Days

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Gone But Not Forgotten: Winlock Egg Days

Gone But Not Forgotten: Winlock Egg Days

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4717479/4717484" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

"The world's largest egg," on display in Winlock. Harriet Baskas hide caption

toggle caption Harriet Baskas

This weekend, the town of Winlock, Wash., will hold its Egg Days festival. Like other summer festivals, there will be carnival rides, a pancake breakfast and a street fair.

But for Winlock, Egg Days also harkens to the town's poultry-filled past, when Winlock was the egg capital of the world. Many of its small chicken ranches were closed by the 1950s as larger farms overtook the industry.

The town still celebrates its roots with the annual festival — and the everpresent shadow of the "world's largest egg." At 14 feet long and 7 1/2 feet tall, the egg is indeed a behemoth; but with a composition of plastic and plywood, it's not made for scrambling.

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