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High Court Allows Ten Commandments Display
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High Court Allows Ten Commandments Display

Law

High Court Allows Ten Commandments Display

High Court Allows Ten Commandments Display
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Rev. Rob Schenck, President of Faith and Action, speaks outside the Supreme Court .

Rev. Rob Schenck, President of Faith and Action, speaks outside the Supreme Court Monday. hide caption

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The Supreme Court rules that Texas may keep its Ten Commandments monument, on the grounds of the state capitol in Austin. The majority opinion said the installment treats the commandments as history.

But the court also ruled that two Kentucky counties unconstitutionally promoted religion by displaying the Ten Commandments in courthouses, contrasting that exhibit with the more neutral use in Texas.

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