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Securing Nukes Is Top Job, Says Terror Panel

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Securing Nukes Is Top Job, Says Terror Panel

Securing Nukes Is Top Job, Says Terror Panel

Securing Nukes Is Top Job, Says Terror Panel

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4720541/4720542" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Weapons of mass destruction remain the greatest threat to national security today, according to former Sen. Sam Nunn and Harvard's Ashton Carter.

The two security experts, part of the 9/11 Public Discourse Project, warn that too much nuclear material remains unsecured.

Nunn and Carter recommended a centralized organization — akin to the new National Counter-Terrorism Center — that would coordinate intelligence and plan operations to rein in the world's deadliest weapons.

They spoke at a panel discussion on terrorism organized by the 9/11 Public Discourse Project, the successor organization of the 9/11 Commission, and the Center for National Policy.