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New Design Bolsters Freedom Tower

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Artist's rendition shows an aerial view of the Freedom Tower design, seen from the East River. i

An artist's rendition shows an aerial view of the Freedom Tower design, seen from the East River. Skidmore, Owings and Merrill hide caption

toggle caption Skidmore, Owings and Merrill
Artist's rendition shows an aerial view of the Freedom Tower design, seen from the East River.

An artist's rendition shows an aerial view of the Freedom Tower design, seen from the East River.

Skidmore, Owings and Merrill
The Freedom Tower would occupy familiar territory at the tip of Manhattan. i

The Freedom Tower would occupy familiar territory at the tip of Manhattan, seen in this artist's rendering of New York Harbor. Skidmore, Owings and Merrill hide caption

toggle caption Skidmore, Owings and Merrill
The Freedom Tower would occupy familiar territory at the tip of Manhattan.

The Freedom Tower would occupy familiar territory at the tip of Manhattan, seen in this artist's rendering of New York Harbor.

Skidmore, Owings and Merrill

The design for New York City's Freedom Tower, originally created by architect Daniel Liebeskind, has undergone a facelift to include more safety precautions against terrorist attacks. The building, while only a single tower, will appear from certain vantages to look like the original twin towers. The tower will rise a symbolic 1,776 feet.

Melissa Block talks with Paul Goldberger, architecture critic for The New Yorker and author of a book about the reconstruction of the World Trade Center site. Goldberger says he feels ambivalence for the building, seeing it as an overall improvement to the skyline. But he feels that the newly hardened base — a measure to foil truck bombs and other attacks — is too imposing.

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