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'Siegfried and Roy' Tiger Probe Yields No Surprises

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'Siegfried and Roy' Tiger Probe Yields No Surprises

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'Siegfried and Roy' Tiger Probe Yields No Surprises

'Siegfried and Roy' Tiger Probe Yields No Surprises

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4724365/4724366" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Government investigators spent nearly a year trying to determine why a 380-pound white tiger mauled entertainer Roy Horn, ending Siegfried and Roy's long-running Las Vegas act. Officials concluded that the tiger acted alone — and very much as one might expect a wild animal to act. Jim Rogers of the U.S. Department of Agriculture fills Steve Inskeep in on the details.

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