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Lavish L.A. Mayoral Residence Stands Unoccupied

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Lavish L.A. Mayoral Residence Stands Unoccupied

U.S.

Lavish L.A. Mayoral Residence Stands Unoccupied

Lavish L.A. Mayoral Residence Stands Unoccupied

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4731682/4731687" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Getty House: Yours rent-free with occupancy of the L.A. mayoral office. hide caption

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Getty House: Yours rent-free with occupancy of the L.A. mayoral office.

A view of the gardens at the mansion. hide caption

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A view of the gardens at the mansion.

The housing market in Los Angeles is notoriously expensive. But there is one home that can't seem to attract a resident, even though the rent is free.

It's a 10,000 square-foot mansion in the tony Windsor Square section of the city, with a private gym, wine cellar, and beautiful gardens on a double lot. But the Getty House is meant for only one tenant, and that's the mayor of Los Angeles.

Mayor Tom Bradley actually lived here for 16 years. But he was the first — and last — mayor to call it home. Since Bradley retired in 1993, subsequent mayors have opted to stay in their own homes.

New Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa is no exception. Though he says his family will "make use of" the mansion, he does not plan to move in.

Still, the house does not lack traffic: Each week, classes of fourth graders tour the mansion for a lesson in civic history.

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