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Govt. Memo Marked Plame's Identity as 'Secret'

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Govt. Memo Marked Plame's Identity as 'Secret'

Govt. Memo Marked Plame's Identity as 'Secret'

Govt. Memo Marked Plame's Identity as 'Secret'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4765052/4765053" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A 2003 State Department memo clearly indicated Valerie Plame's identity was to be kept secret, according to a Washington Post story. Plame, wife of Ambassador Joseph Wilson, is the CIA officer whose identity was made public in a leak to the press. President Bush's advisor, Karl Rove, has been taken to task for his off-the-record conversations with reporters about Plame.

Some critics accuse Rove of breaking the law. They say he leaked Plame's identity in retaliation for husband Joseph Wilson's refusal to back the Bush Administration's claims about Iraq. Hear Melissa Block and Walter Pincus of The Washington Post.

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