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Fritz Attaway, Moving from Film to Books

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Fritz Attaway, Moving from Film to Books

Fritz Attaway, Moving from Film to Books

Fritz Attaway, Moving from Film to Books

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Fritz Attaway's reading tastes are framed in part by the nature of his job as executive vice president for government relations and general counsel at the Motion Picture Association of America. hide caption

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Last month, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that movie studios and record labels can sue software companies that allow customers to pirate music and movies online. Fritz Attaway testified on behalf of Hollywood and the music industry. He's executive vice president for government relations and Washington general counsel for the Motion Picture Association of America.

He's splitting this summer between the nation's capital and Jamestown, R.I., with different books for each locale.

Fritz Attway's List:

Gone for Soldiers, by Jeff Shaara.

When Hollywood Had a King, by Connie Bruck. "[Lew Wasserman, the biography's subject] was pretty much was the person that all of the studios looked to for guidance and direction, particularly in the area of politics, which is where I operate here in Washington. And he was just a larger-than-life individual that I wanted to learn more about, particularly his early years, how he got to where he was when I came into contact with him."

Third Eye, by T. Lobsang Rampa.

The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, by Sogyal Rinpoche. "At one time, I thought that Buddhism was a religion that I could identify with. But after reading that book, I've decided that Buddhism is very fatalistic, and I'm not."

Atlas Shrugged and Anthem, both by Ayn Rand. "The symbolism is about individualism, which is Rand's theme in all of her books."

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