Voices in the News

A sound montage of some of the voices in this past week's news, including Baltimore Orioles' baseball player Raphael Palmeiro; Discovery Commander Eileen Collins; Admiral Victor Fyodorov, Commander of Russia's Pacific Fleet; U.S. President George W. Bush; U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan; British Prime Minister Tony Blair; U.S. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld; the mother and sister of deceased U.S. Marine Edward Schroeder from Ohio.

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LIANE HANSEN, host:

From NPR News, this is WEEKEND EDITION. I'm Liane Hansen.

And these were some of the voices in the news this past week.

Mr. RAFAEL PALMEIRO (Baltimore Orioles): I have never intentionally used steroids never, ever, period. When I found out that I had failed a test under the new drug policy, I filed a grievance and challenged the suspension on the basis that I had never intentionally taken a banned substance.

Commander EILEEN COLLINS (Space Shuttle Discovery): Houston and Station, we have physical separation. We're going to spend the rest of the day today stowing the cabin, basically putting up the chutes and getting our communications and our suits ready, the orange suits that we wear, the pressure suits.

Admiral VIKTOR FYODOROV (Commander, Russia's Pacific Fleet): (Through Translator) Dear friends, comrades, today at 14 hours, 15 minutes local time, the happy moment arrived when the tense work of trying to free our underwater craft, stranded at a depth of 200 meters, was completed. The craft surfaced.

President GEORGE W. BUSH: Ambassador Bolton believes passionately in the goals of the United Nations Charter: to advance peace and liberty and human rights. His mission is now to help the UN reform itself, to renew its founding promises for the 21st century.

Secretary-General KOFI ANNAN (United Nations): It is all right for one ambassador to come and push, but an ambassador always has to remember that there are 190 others who will have to be convinced, or a vast majority of them, for action to take place.

Prime Minister TONY BLAIR (Great Britain): We need a situation where you don't come in as a foreign cleric to come preach in this country if you're one of these people who's going to come in and preach this type of extremism. And those who are foreign nationals and are preaching this type of extremism, I'm afraid they're going to have to go back.

Secretary DONALD RUMSFELD (Defense Department): They seem to cling to the discredited theory that the recent attacks in London and elsewhere, for example, are really in retaliation for the war in Iraq or for the so-called occupation of Afghanistan. That is nonsense.

Ms. ROSEMARY PALMER (Mother of Deceased US Marine Edward Schroeder): The company's getting smaller and smaller because more and more guys have been killed. So it's getting to the point where, if you're getting 14 guys, the odds are getting really tight. And so the chances of it being him were pretty high.

AMANDA (Sister of Deceased US Marine Edward Schroeder): I'm a pacifist. I did not support this war, but I obviously supported my brother. And I don't think his death is going to change, like, what the administration wants to do, but I think it should.

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