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Child Soldiers of the Lord's Resistance Army

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Child Soldiers of the Lord's Resistance Army

Art & Design

Child Soldiers of the Lord's Resistance Army

Child Soldiers of the Lord's Resistance Army

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Los Angeles Times photographer Francine Orr has covered Africa and other world hot spots for years. In her travels, she's seen first-hand the faces and heard the voices of child soldiers caught up in brutal conflicts.

Orr recently published a photo essay of images from Uganda, and the children fighters of the so-called Lord's Resistance Army, or LRA. "It's a rebel group led by Joseph Koney," Orr says. "Some people say he's demon-possessed. No one really knows what his agenda is."

Whatever his agenda, he's caught a whole generation of young soldiers in his web. Orr's photo essay captures the pain and horror felt by the army's victims as the decades-long civil war continues in Uganda.

Lokeria Aciro recovers at a hospital in northern Uganda. She had her lips and ears cut off by an 11-year-old soldier of the LRA when she and other women left a refugee camp to gather firewood. The other women were taken by the rebels. Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times hide caption

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Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times

Lokeria Aciro recovers at a hospital in northern Uganda. She had her lips and ears cut off by an 11-year-old soldier of the LRA when she and other women left a refugee camp to gather firewood. The other women were taken by the rebels.

Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times