NPR logo

Dependence, Distrust on the Fort Hall Reservation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4792813/4792927" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Dependence, Distrust on the Fort Hall Reservation

Dependence, Distrust on the Fort Hall Reservation

Dependence, Distrust on the Fort Hall Reservation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4792813/4792927" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A sign on Interstate 15 for the half-million acre Fort Hall Indian Reservation. Jeff Brady, NPR hide caption

toggle caption Jeff Brady, NPR

Native Americans on the Fort Hall Indian Reservation in eastern Idaho have an uneasy relationship with the U.S. government. The history of tribal relations with the federal government has made the Shoshone and Bannock tribes distrustful, yet a lack of economic resources means many still rely on its support.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.