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Fayetteville and Fort Bragg, Serving Each Other

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Fayetteville and Fort Bragg, Serving Each Other

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Fayetteville and Fort Bragg, Serving Each Other

Fayetteville and Fort Bragg, Serving Each Other

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4798141/4798423" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Homecoming reception for soldiers returning from Iraq to Pope Air Force Base at Fort Bragg, N.C. Christopher Sims/Center for Documentary Studies hide caption

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Christopher Sims/Center for Documentary Studies

Fayetteville, N.C., is home to Fort Bragg, the Army's biggest post by population. There are 60,000 military and civilian employees at the facility. Soldiers and their families make up half the city's population, and Fort Bragg's $2 billion annual payroll fuels the local economy. But as John Biewen of American RadioWorks reports, Fayetteville struggles with image problems — and real problems — that come with being a military town.