NPR logo
Despite Turmoil, Christians Place Faith in New Iraq
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4799390/4799434" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Despite Turmoil, Christians Place Faith in New Iraq

Religion

Despite Turmoil, Christians Place Faith in New Iraq

Despite Turmoil, Christians Place Faith in New Iraq
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4799390/4799434" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Christians comprise one of Iraq's oldest populations, and one of the country's most vulnerable minorities. Along with their neighbors, the Kurds, Christians were persecuted by the Baath regime and expelled from homelands in the north. Today, more than three million Iraqi Christians live outside Iraq.

But nearly a million Christians remain, and many want their land back. Efforts toward that end face many obstacles as Iraq struggles to create a government which allows effective power-sharing between a Shiite Muslim majority and the interests of Kurds and Sunni Muslims. Christians, a much smaller and weaker minority, hope for a just resolution, but fear they will again be shut out.

Thomas Shabo has restored the church at Fishkhabor in Northern Iraq.

Thomas Shabo has restored the church at Fishkhabor in Northern Iraq. Jacki Lyden, NPR hide caption

toggle caption Jacki Lyden, NPR

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.