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Fisherman Reverses Himself, 80 Miles Back to Shore

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Fisherman Reverses Himself, 80 Miles Back to Shore

Fisherman Reverses Himself, 80 Miles Back to Shore

Fisherman Reverses Himself, 80 Miles Back to Shore

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4811540/4811541" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The next time your car stalls out on the road, think of Jim Peterson. The professional fisherman found himself stalled far off the coast of Oregon in his 38-foot troller. So he decided to drive home in reverse. Peterson compared the ordeal to backing up a truck towing a trailer, all 80miles to shore. Thirty nine hours later Peterson, his deckhand and 13 tuna hit the docks, backwards.