Actor Scott Goes the Distance with 'Saint Ralph'

Campbell Scott as Father Hibbert in 'Saint Ralph' i i

hide captionCampbell Scott knew very little about the Catholic church and had never played a priest before, but enjoyed diving into the role of a mentor.

Samuel Goldwyn Films
Campbell Scott as Father Hibbert in 'Saint Ralph'

Campbell Scott knew very little about the Catholic church and had never played a priest before, but enjoyed diving into the role of a mentor.

Samuel Goldwyn Films
Campbell Scott as Father Hibbert, on bicycle, with Adam Butcher in scene from 'Saint Ralph' i i

hide captionAs Father Hibbert, Scott helps young Ralph Walker (played by Adam Butcher) train for the 1954 Boston Marathon.

Samuel Goldwyn Films
Campbell Scott as Father Hibbert, on bicycle, with Adam Butcher in scene from 'Saint Ralph'

As Father Hibbert, Scott helps young Ralph Walker (played by Adam Butcher) train for the 1954 Boston Marathon.

Samuel Goldwyn Films

He's played Robert Benchley and Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. He's been cast as an introspective dentist, an atomic scientist, a cop and Hamlet. Now, in the film Saint Ralph, Campbell Scott takes a turn as a priest.

But he's not the title character. He's the title character's coach. Saint Ralph is an underdog's story, set in 1950s Canada, of a young Catholic boy whose dream is to win the Boston Marathon... a miraculous goal he hopes will bring his mother out of a coma. Ralph is portrayed by a big-screen newcomer, Adam Butcher.

Scott — son of acting legends George C. Scott and Colleen Dewhurst — is cast as Father Hibbert, a somewhat iconoclastic man of the cloth, who helps the youngster develop a previously untapped talent for long-distance running. Scott tells Liane Hansen about the movie and about the challenges of the role.

Director Michael McGowan's film premiered at the 2004 Toronto Film Festival, and is now being released in the United States. McGowan comes to the role with some expertise. He's the winner of the 1984 Detroit Marathon.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: