NPR logo

Reforming Juvenile Justice

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4822115/4822116" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Reforming Juvenile Justice

U.S.

Reforming Juvenile Justice

Reforming Juvenile Justice

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4822115/4822116" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

States such as Louisiana have seen high rates of recidivism among young people and young adults. Some blame the juvenile justice system, in which young offenders convicted of minor offenses such as shoplifting are imprisoned with kids who've committed serious crimes such as murder or rape.

Guests debate whether the system is broken, and what might be done to lower the number of repeat offenders.

Guests:

Mark Steward, executive director of the Missouri Youth Services Institute; retired director of the Missouri Division of Youth Services; works with Louisiana Office of Youth Development to develop changes in the state's juvenile reform system

Vincent Schiraldi, director, D.C. Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services

David Utter, executive of the Juvenile Justice Project of Louisiana

Michael Kroll, senior editor of The Beat Within, a weekly magazine with material written by youth in California juvenile corrections facilities

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.