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New Orleans Swims in Katrina's Wake

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New Orleans Swims in Katrina's Wake

U.S.

New Orleans Swims in Katrina's Wake

New Orleans Swims in Katrina's Wake

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A man puts his baby on top of his car as he and a woman abandon the vehicle, which had begun to float in flooding caused by Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. Reuters hide caption

toggle caption Reuters

Some 1 million people had fled the area ahead of Hurricane Katrina, which weakened as it neared land with winds of 155 mph. Reuters hide caption

toggle caption Reuters

The center of New Orleans has plenty of broken windows and flying debris, but it is largely empty of people, as Hurricane Katrina makes its way inland. The system came ashore as a Category Four storm Monday morning east of New Orleans.

Katrina made landfall with winds of more than 150 mph, but it has since lessened in intensity. Early indications are that the city did not suffer a catastrophic hit, as some officials feared. About 1 million people fled the city before Katrina arrived.

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