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Wetlands and Flooding in New Orleans

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Wetlands and Flooding in New Orleans

Environment

Wetlands and Flooding in New Orleans

Wetlands and Flooding in New Orleans

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4822549/4822550" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Historically, wetland vegetation works as a buffer zone during hurricanes. Now that so much is gone, New Orleans is at greater risk of flooding.

Experts say the change is due to the building of levies along the Mississippi river delta to protect New Orleans from flooding have, over the past 80 years, contributed to the decline of wetland vegetation along the coast.

Melissa Block talks with Joe Suhayda, an oceanographer who studies the decline of coastal wetlands in Louisiana.

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