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The Future of Hurricane Science and Prediction

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The Future of Hurricane Science and Prediction

Science

The Future of Hurricane Science and Prediction

The Future of Hurricane Science and Prediction

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Hurricane Katrina is one of the most powerful storms ever to hit the U.S. Are we seeing more — and more intense — storms? Could global warming be to blame?We get a report on Hurricane Katrina, take a look at hurricane science and prediction and see what's in store for the rest of the Atlantic hurricane season.

Guests:

Chris Landsea, research meteorologist at NOAA Hurricane Research Division in Miami

Kerry Emanuel, author of Divine Wind: The History and Science of Hurricanes; professor in the Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass.