Savoring the Tastes of New Orleans

Poet Ellis Marsalis III remembers the smell of Magnolia Trees, gumbo, shrimp po'boys and crawfish etouffee in New Orleans.

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Mr. ELLIS MARSALIS III: Hello. My name is Ellis Marsalis III. I was born in Kenner, Louisiana; moved to New Orleans when I was a little boy. That's where I spent the rest of my growing-up days. Right now I hail from Baltimore, Maryland. What I remember most about New Orleans is just in the springtime when the magnolia trees bloom. That's my favorite time. I know we're going to smell that smell again, along with gumbo, shrimp po-boys and crawfish etouffee. Although it seems tough now because, you know, we're scattered out all over the country it seems, we will be back down on the Crescent, back down in the Quarter doing what we usually do: making food, making music and having a good time.

For people who are from there, y'all know that pulling for New Orleans is like pulling for the saints. You just gotta have heart, 'cause one day you know the saints are gonna come marching in. It means you gotta make sure we all gonna be in that number. I'll be in that number. You'll be too.

(Soundbite of music)

SCOTT SIMON (Host): You're listening to WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News.

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